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Classroom Management Outline

Paragraph 1 (Behavioral Stages for children in elementary school): Amanda Carpenter
Paragraph 2 (Classroom Discipline specific to elementary school): Emily Sisler
Paragraph 3 (Classroom Discipline specific to high school): Josh Wilson
Paragraph 4 (Classroom setting and climate): John Hopkins
Paragraph 5 (Classroom structure in a physical education setting): Lindsey Keyton

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John Hopkins, Amanda Carpenter, Lindsey Keyton, Josh Wilson, Emily Sisler

Assignment Three: Notes (Amanda Carpenter)
• Children have different stages and behavior levels (power stage, reward punishment stage, mutual interpersonal stage, and social order stage)
• Each stage most be dealt with individually
• The same forms of discipline do not work for every child
• You can not expect great improvements in a child after only a single success
• Raising your voice, insulting a child, referring to yourself as “the boss”, physical force, and many other degrading techniques do not work and only harm the child and further the problem
• As a new teacher is it important to be firm, fair, and show every student respect
• Routines are important; they maintain a order and balance, give chi ldren expectations

Churchward, B. (2009). Strategies for Discipline. Retrieved September 11, 2009, from http://www.theteachersguide.com/ClassManagement.htm#Internet%2 0Resources.

• There are proactive measures that can be taken to insure well behaved students; furniture arrangement, division of strenuous and fun activities, direct explanation of procedures and expectations, group building activities, and a reward system
• The first few days of school are most important when establishes rules and boundaries for students
• Always follow through with each rule
• Be sure to take a leadership position with every activity
• Balance discipline and humor
• Acting quiet and simply waiting for the classes attention will gain it
• Create choices for your students in activities
• Be mindful of body language between you and your students

Rockwell, S. (2000-2009). Behavior Management-Proactive Measures. Retrieved September 11, 2009, from http://www.teachervision.fen.com/teaching- methods/classroom-management/7235.html?detoured=1

• Preferred Activity Time (PAT) is a type of reward system
• A specific time is set everyday or once a week, depending on the school, and day’s activities, where students are able to do a choice activity
• PAT most by earned by every child and is not a guarantee
• Allows for student and teacher interaction on another level
• Children rate this highly as reward system
• Meant for children in the elementary level
• Can work in a variety of subject areas

Bafile, C. (2009). Preferred Activity Time is Preferred by Kids and Teachers. Retrieved September 11, 2009, from http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/curr315.shtml


Assignment 3: Notes (Josh Wilson)

Source 1:
  • "Classrooms with computers or computer rooms need organization and management. Scheduling and rotation are an important aspect of the "wired" (McKenzie, 1998) classroom. Teachers need to plan ahead for student rotation in an efficient way."
  • "There are two reasons for keeping students actively engaged in pairs, individually or in teams. First, it allows the teacher to work with other individuals or small groups. Secondly, pairs or small teams may be a solution to a limited number of computers in the classroom."
  • "Forming teams needs planning. It may be necessary for teachers to "consider computer skills and specific assignment when pairing students, change partners if conflict arises or needs are different, have peers critique projects and give constructive feedback and have trained experts from the class help others" (Bray, 2003). "
  • "Every school should have an Acceptable User Policy signed by both students and their parents on what constitutes proper behavior when using technology. In addition teachers will want to "establish norms for student behavior when using equipment to complete an assignment."

Deutsch, N. (2009). Effective classroom management strategies for technology. Nellie's English Projects. Retrieved from http://www.nelliemuller.com/effectiveclassroommanagementstrategiesfortechnology.htm
Source 2:
  • Avoid calling out a student with a behavior problem publicly. Address the student in private, not in front of his or her classmates.
  • The first day of class is very important. Establishing "ground rules" during the first week of class will help to reduce behavior problems.
  • Early morning or after lunch classes may lead to less attentiveness in students. Warm-up or brainteaser activities may be a good way to begin these classes.
  • In a new class with a new teacher, students may feel uncomfortable. Is it important to "break the ice" with new students.

Rodriquez, L. (n.d.). Classroom management. Retrieved from http://www.4faculty.org/includes/108r2.jsp

Source 3:
  • "To manage behavior through consequences, use this multi-step process:
  1. The problem must be defined, usually by count or description.
  2. Design a way to change the behavior.
  3. Identify an effective reinforcer.
  4. Apply the reinforcer consistently to shape or change behavior."

  • Positive reinforcement of a good behavior often leads to the reoccurrence of that behavior.
  • Students who display negative behaviors should not receive continuous attenti on from the teacher. A student who receives constant attention for bad behavior may display the behavior more frequently.
  • Three keys to using punishment appropriately and effectively in the classro om are timing, intensity, and consistency.
  • A negative behavior may be suppressed by punishment, but is often not eliminated. The suppression of the negative behavior is also frequently of short duration.

Mather, N., & Goldstein, S. (2001). Behavior modification in the classroom. LDOnline. Retrieved from http://www.ldonline.org/article/Behavior_Modification_in_the_Classroom.


John Hopkins
Classroom Climate and Setting

The climate and setting of a classroom is an overlooked piece that helps create an enjoyable experience for both the students and the teacher. The climate should be one where ideas and experiences can bounced off of each other. The students should feel safe in letting their feeling and opinions known. There should be no shouting out or rudeness in the classroom. If this happens the students should be given a verbal warning and more if the problem persists. They students need to know that they will not be laughed at or ridiculed for their thoughts and beliefs. In pertaining to physical education, the students need to treat others with respect and be sportsmanlike. They need to understand that learning new skills is more important than winning or losing. When there is a positive climate to the class the students will enjoy the material more and be more excited about class. The setting of the class also plays an importan
t role. In normal classrooms there should be educational and interesting. These posters can keep students interest and help them learn. The class should also be orderly with all of the teacher’s things being orderly and the desks being in an arrangement that makes sense, whether it is rows or tables. All of these things will help make classroom management easier for the teacher. With these ideas in place the students will be more excited and involved with class.
Assignment 3


1. This was a great site that talks about classroom management in a physical education setting. The writer talks about creating a classroom with mutual respect. It is important to treat the students with res pect and to treat them equally. If you do this then they will more likely than not give you respect. Sportsmanlike conduct is also talked about. The author talks about giving the students a verbal warning if they do not display good sportsmanship. The author feels that the teacher should think before they speak so you don’t say something you don’t mean.

Pica, R (2003). Effective Classroom Management: A Teacher's Guide. Retrieved from http://www.nobleednews.com/classroom_management.htm
2. This article has many strategies that are more of the military flavor. They talk about using a whistle and calling “Ten Hut” . They say this will help build discipline for the students. They say the class should be split up by alphabetical order. This may be a bit impersonal but this would definitely cut down on time and help class be more effective. The author also likes to get the classes input on things. They like to hear what they had to say and what they think of the activities.

Manross, M(2009). Classroom Management Ideas. Retrieved from http://www.theteacherscorner.net/classroom-management/lineup.htm

3. This article talked a lot about creating a great classroom climate. The climate is very important because it helps the students feel safe and so they can learn in a positive environment. You must create an environment that is able to get students motivated to do things they may not normally want to. It is important for kids to feel safe to begin. Without safety, the students will not want to do anything. The students need to be responsible and be accountable for their actions. This is key. Another thing that is important is keeping your class in context with what you are normally doing. This will help keep students on task and involved.
McCurdy, K (2007). Creating a Positive Climate for Learning. Retrieved from http://www.pecentral.org/climate/


Assignment 3
Emily Sisler

Website #1:
Dr. Scott Mandel established this website, which was created by teachers for other teachers. This site offers a great deal of useful information dealing with lesson plans, bulletin board designs, and specific curriculum topics. Under classroom management, there are many specific suggestions on what to consider before beginning the school year. Mandel’s site states that classroom arrangement is important to maintaining good student behavior. Students have ample opportunity to misbehave if the classroom set-up is not well thought out. A three-sided box shape has been found to be an effective way to organize student desks to promote concentration and avoid distractions from other students. It is also important to discuss school rules on the first day of school. This will help establish expectations early on, so there are no questions about how students should behave. After discussing the specific classroom rules, a teacher must be consistent in his or her discipline policy. Students will gain more respect for these rule s if they are enforced properly. Teachers should also create detailed and organized lesson p lans. If the teacher is prepared, there will be no down time for students to misbehave. Becoming familiar with various school procedures before school begins is important for teachers. Fire drills, the dismissal process, and lunch shift organization will run much smoother if the teacher knows exactly what is taking place in order to instruct the students properly. A classroom tends to be chaotic if the students are not given specific and direct directions. A teacher should develop ideas for the best ways students can move around the classroom for various reasons (clean-up and handing in work are examples). If a specific plan is created and explained to the students, there will be less confusion and less of a chance for off-task students. Lastly, designing a welcoming classroom that promotes a positive and fun learning environment is always a great way to begin the school year. This article offered some helpful ideas on ways to manage a classroom effectively. Classroom management is the key to helping your students learn. If the classroom is well controlled, students will be in a more learner-friendly atmosphere.

Mandel, Dr. S. (1995). Classroom Management.Teachers Helping Teachers. Retrieved from http://www.pacificnet.net/~mandel/ClassroomManagement.html

Website #2:
Beth Lewis has written several articles, all focusing on various ways to have more success with classroom management. Lewis talks about establishing a behavior contract for students who are having extra difficulty following directions. This may be an effective way for that student to work towards maintaining good behavior throughout the day with the hopes of being rewarded at the end. Rewards are a great way to enforce good behavior. No-cost rewards, like longer recess, lunch with the teacher and special seats in the classroom are great ways to save money and still reinforce your classroom rules in a fun way. Non-verbal communic ation with your students is important. If you establish signals that symbolize that you want your students to be quiet, it will help you get their attention without having to yell over their voices. It also makes less of a distraction and is easier to refocus the students. It is useful to post classroom rules in a visible location in large, bold print. Students will then be reminded frequently of the expectations of the classroom and this may remind them to remain on-task. Lewis also suggests holding occasional class meetings where you can discuss classroom behavior with your students, such as good manners and how to treat other students. This can serve as a reminder to the students to ensure they are treating one another with respect and these meetings can help maintain a positive classroom environment.

Lewis, B. (2009). Behavior Management and Student Discipline. Retrieved from http://k6educators.about.com/od/classroommanagement/a/communitycircs.htm


Website # 3:
Cathy Brand is a first grade teacher who has created this website containing many techniques she uses in her classroom that have proved effective. From reading through her suggestions, it sounds like she has a very well maintained classroom. She talks a lot about using music through singing and chants to gain student attention. She also has a “Clean Desk Fairy” who visits desks on various occasions and gives a reward to those with a clean desk. When it is time to clean-up the room, Brand makes up a game to go along with it called “Go Go Stop.” Much of her classroom is organized by colors to make it easier dividing students and keeping track of her papers. As a reward, she uses a reward board where well-behaved students can write their name and are later chosen for special tasks. Also, she has a candy jar where good student behavior earns candy to help fill up the jar. They then have a special classroom celebration and enjoy the candy. She has special techniques for the students w hen they line up. She gives them specific directions, so they will maintain good behavior while walking thro ugh the halls. Brand encourages her students to greet one another in the morning or shake each other’s hand. This helps reinforce good manners and treating their classmates with respect. Brand has techniques and strategies for all areas of her classroom. She takes the time to celebrate her students, but to teach them proper classroom behavior. This article provided many helpful ideas that I would like to use in my future classroom.

Brand, C. D. (n.d). Classroom Management Tips and Beginning of the Year Ideas. Retrieved from http://www.fvsd.ab.ca/stm/welcome%20back%20to%20school%20page.ht


Amanda Carpenter
When dealing with the discipline of a child and overall form of classroom management it is important to realize that every child is at a different level or stage in behavioral growth. Each stage of behavioral growth is unique and requires a personal touch. One method of discipline will not always work on every behavioral stage. The first behavioral stage is the power stage where children are often resistant to authority figures and have little self-control. Typically children that have reached the age of five have out grown this stage, but a small percentage does exist within the elementary system. These children will often take what they want, show little concern for the emotional needs of others, and often seek objects such as pencils, scissors, and rulers to be extensions of their power and forms of weapons. The second stage is that of punishment and reward, where children are often seeking a matter of return. This is where are reward system comes into play. A child will perform on task if a known reward item is present. This is stage that is most prominent in elementary classroom, but usually ends by the age of nine. The mutual interpersonal stage is the third stage where children look in ways to behave that would please a teacher. These students can make up a fifth grade classroom to any middle school classroom. The best way to handle their forms of misbehavior is through gentle guidance. It is common at the elementary level to have students that are in between the second and third stage where a combination of rewards and guidance is useful to curve negative behavior. The fourth stage is that of social order. Students are learning to behave because it is the right thing to do or it is what is needed for the smoothness of a classroom or learning environment. These students rarely have behavioral problems. Most of these individuals appear in middle and high schools, however there will be some elementary students who grasp this concept. It is important to understand the different behavioral stages because every child is different. What may work successfully for one child in a more advan ce stage would have a negative effect on a child performing at lower stage. Knowing the difference in the behavioral stages is key in classroom management strategies.

Emily Sisler
Because students all may be at different behavioral stages, a teacher can use several different techniques to maintain classroom discipline for the elementary class. A teacher should initially est ablish the rules of the classroom and what is expected of them. These rules can then be posted in the classroom where they are easily visible to the students. At the elementary level, some kind of reward system can be devised where the class is working toward obtaining something special for their good behavior. It may be extra recess or a special treat, but this will help students work harder if they know they will be rewarded for it. A teacher may also find it helpful if they stress good manners and respect at the beginning of school. If students are continually reminded of the teacher’s expectations for how to treat other students, hopefully students will catch on without having to be reminded. This may eliminate problem behavior throughout the rest of the year. A teacher must be sure he or she has an organized classroom set-up and daily schedule. If the teacher is prepared, this will help students stay on-task and fall into a routine where they know the schedule. When a classroom of students move around simultaneously, it can be quite hectic; therefore, a teacher could come up with clever ways to line students up or dismiss them to another location. This will help prevent misbehavior during this time. Also, a teacher may come up with a saying, song , or chant that can be used while the students are lining up. This would serve as an extra reminder to remain quiet while walking from the classroom to other locations in the school. When students are talkative and fidgety, the teacher may allow them to get out of their seats to stretch or do some kind of quick physical activity. This may allow them to re-focus their attention on their work. Managing a classroom is no easy task. A teacher must be creative and clever in coming up with specific techniques that do not allow for students to get out of hand. As long as he or she is prepared and consistent, students will beco me accustomed to the expectations and consequences of the classroom if they are established and emphasized immediately.
Brand, C.D. (n.d). Classroom Management Tips and Beginning of the Year Ideas. Retrieved from http://www.fvsd.ab.ca/stm/classroom_management_tips_and_be.htm

Josh Wilson
There are many techniques to help to maintain discipline within the high school classroom. First of all, high school teachers should build up good relationships with their students. They should discover the different interests of each student. Teachers who seem interested in their students’ lives outside of the classroom will have a better relationship with the students within the classroom. It is important for teachers to set classroom rules and ensure that they are followed. Rules should be established on the first day of class and should be enforced throughout the year. Also, teachers should follow their own rules. A teacher cannot demand respect within the classroom if he is not modeling respect himself. This respect includes addressing problems in private. If a student is disruptive, the teacher should not embarrass the student by calling him out in front of his classmates. Teachers should place the weight of responsibility on their students’ shoulders. If a student is sent to the office, the teacher should convey the idea that the student is responsible for making the decision to be sent to the office rather than to sit in class and behave appropriately. This way the student cannot be mad at the teacher, because it was the student’s decision to misbehave. Also, teachers should always be fully aware of the school’s policies. These policies should also be in effect within the classroom. Motivation is another good disciplinary tool, even for teens and young adults. Positive feedback should be given to students on a daily basis. When students know that they are doing something correctly, they will have motivation to keep up the good work. Teachers must keep in mind that some high school students may not want to be acknowledged in front of their peers. These students may feel awkward for being praised, and positive feedback in a private setting may serve as a better motivator. High school classrooms should be designed to be exciting, positive, and safe places to learn. Implementing the correct management strategies will help to reduce, or even eliminate, discipline problems.

Gaut, M. (2002). Discipline for the high school classroom. Retrieved from
http://www.essortment.com/family/disciplinehigh_snvz.htm


Lindsey Keyton
Classroom Management Notes
Summary #1:
The first classroom management idea I viewed was titled, “Team Colors.” This article summarizes how the purpose of the activity was to manage classroom transitions. The materials that were used for the activity were pinnies, tape, and colored cones. The suggested grade level for the activity ranges from third grade to fifth grade. This idea describes how at the beginning of the school year, the Physical Education teacher divided the students into groups of four to five students. Each group had a team color and one team captain. The teacher would call out colors when she wanted to divide the students into groups during physical education class. The teacher would rotate captains every six to nine weeks so that each student in the class would have the at least one opportunity to be the team captain. The team captain was responsible for collecting and distributing equipment to group members, and returning the equipment at the end of class.
I believe that this is a great way to ensure classroom management. The teacher did an excellent job of placing students into groups at the beginning of the year to avoid confusion and arguments throughout the remainder of the year. Most students find great comfort in knowing that there are routines and order in the classroom. Therefore, the teacher will most likely have more success with managing the classroom if he/she begins the year by presenting group rules, stipulations, and expectations to all of the students.
Summary #2:
The second classroom management idea I viewed was titled, “All Star Award.” This article summarizes how the purpose of the activity was to use positive reinforcement to ensure that students were putting their best efforts forward in P.E. class and wearing the appropriate clothing for P.E. class. This idea was directed mainly for K-12 students. This idea describes how the teacher reviews the classroom rules for the gymnasium on the first week of school. Then the teacher places a baseball field (on a poster board) on the wall on the second week of school. The teacher explains to his/her students that earning runs is a team effort. Therefore, each class is required to work as a team to earn runs by dressing appropriately and putting forward best efforts during P.E. class. Students have the opportunity to go two bases during one P.E. class (one base for dressing appropriately and one base for putting effort into class). After the students reach home plate five times, they are allowed to choose an item from the treat box. When the students reach home plate ten times, they are permitted to choose the next P.E. activity for the next class. Finally, if the students reach home plate fifteen times, they are allotted an extra day of P.E. for the following week.

I believe that this is a great incentive for students to dress appropriately for P.E. class; however, I do not think it is an acceptable incentive for students to put forward effort during Physical Education. It is difficult to measure a person’s “best effort” in P.E. class because some students are naturally gifted and excel in athletics. Those students usually do not need to put forward “best efforts” because athletics comes natural to them. On the other hand, some students try extremely hard to do their best and to an outsider looking in, those students may seem like they are n ot putting forward their best efforts. As a result, this method of classroom management may be ineffective in particular situations because it is difficult to measure a person’s “best efforts.”
Summary #3:
The third classroom management idea I viewed was titled, “Keep Your Caboose.” This article summarizes how the purpose of the activity was to demonstrate to the students the correct way to walk down the hallway. This activity was directed towards first and second grade level students. This idea describes that when students line up to travel to a specific destination, students are required to follow the person in front of them. Before departing the home base, the teacher will assign a student the role of being the caboose. The teacher explains to the students that the caboose in the back of the train. During the voyage from home base to the given destination, the teacher will monitor the students to view whether or not they are following the rules. If a student breaks the rules while walking in line down the hallway, then that particular student will be sent to the end of the line behind the caboose.
I do not think this is an effective method of managing behavior because I believe it would cause more congestion rather than alter behavior problems. I could definitely predict that things would go from bad to worse in this situation because some students may rebel so they can go to the back of the line and have a chance to play the role of the caboose. I do not think this method will work well because there is not an incentive for the students. If the teacher would explain to the students the significance of being in the front of the line, then the teacher may have more success with the students following the rules.




Lindsey Keyton
ED 346
Classroom Management-Physical Education
Classroom management plays an essential role in the determination of whether a teacher is successful or whether the teacher needs to make modifications and adjustments to his or her teaching style. Managing the classroom is extremely important for a teacher to maintain control over his or her students; however, this section will focus centrally on managing the Physical Education classroom and the significance of ensuring proper structure in the gymnasium. It is important to minimize transition periods and down time in physical education because students use equipment in P.E. class that can lead to danger situations if the equipment is improperly used. Therefore, P.E. teachers must discover effective methods of managing the classroom in order to practice safe habits in the gymnasium. One way a P.E. teacher can effectively structure the classroom is to organize students into groups at the beginning of the year. For instance, the teacher could divide the students into five groups of approximately five students in each group. Then the teacher could assign a color to each group so that whenever the teacher needed to place the students into groups for activities, all the teacher would have to do is say the signal word (groups) and the students would know that they need to get in their groups.
Another classroom management idea would be to use incentives for good behavior in the gymnasium. For example, one idea a teacher discovered was to place a poster of a baseball field on the gymnasium wall. Then each time the students dressed appropriately for class and followed the rules of the gymnasium, the students would score a run on the poster of the baseball field. For every five runs that are scored during the P.E. class, an award will be given. The awards could be the students have the opportunity to choose the class activity, choosing an award from a prize box, or the students could have an extra P.E. class the following week. This could be an effective way to encourage students to dress appropriately and be on their best behavior.

Works Cited:

Burke, Dawn. (2002 September). All Star Award. Retrieved September 12, 2009, from
http://www.pecentral.org/lessonideas/viewlesson.asp?ID=3679
Wright, Sue. (2002 August). Team Colors. Retrieved September 12, 2009, from
http://www.pecentral.org/lessonideas/viewlesson.asp?ID=3603




Classroom Management Group Paper:


Classroom management is a key aspect of being a successful teacher. It encompasses reaching out to different learners and what they bring to the class, discipline, classroom climate, and the structure of the classroom. All of these are different parts of the equation, but play an important role in classroom management. There are many variables in deciding how to set up classroom management, such as the subject being taught, inclusion concerns and the overall nature of the class.

When dealing with the discipline of a child and overall form of classroom management, it is important to realize that every child is at a different stage in behavioral growth. Each stage of behavioral growth is unique and requires a personal touch. One method of discipline will not always work on every behavioral stage. The first behavioral stage is the power stage. In this stage, children are often resistant to authority figures and have little self-control. Typically children who have reached the age of five have out grown this stage, but small percentages do exist within the elementary system. These children will often take what they want, show little concern for the emotional needs of others, and often seek objects such as pencils, scissors, and rulers to be extensions of their power and serve as a weapon. The second stage is that of punishment and reward. In this stage, our children are often seeking a matter of return. This is where a reward system comes into play. A child will perform on-task if an incentive is present. This is the most prominent stage in an elementary classroom, but usually ends by the age of nine. The third stage is the mutual interpersonal stage where children are looking for ways to behave that would please a teacher. These students usually range from fifth grade to the middle school classroom. The best way to handle this form of misbehavior is through gentle guidance. It is common at the elementary level to have students that are in between the second and third stage where a combination of rewards and guidance is useful to curve negative behavior. The fourth stage is that of social order. Students are learning to behave because it is the right thing to do or it is what is needed for the classroom to run smoothly. These students rarely have behavioral problems. Most of these individuals appear in middle and high schools; however, there will be some elementary students who grasp this concept. It is important to understand the different behavioral stages because every child is different. What may work successfully for one child in a more advanced stage would have a negative effect on a child performing at a lower stage (Churchward, 2009). Knowing the difference in the behavioral stages is needed for developing classroom management strategies.

Because students all may be at different behavioral stages, a teacher can use several different techniques to maintain classroom discipline for the elementary class. A teacher should initially establish the rules of the classroom and what is expected of them. These rules can then be posted in the classroom where they are easily visible to the students. At the elementary level, some kind of reward system can be devised where the class is working toward obtaining something special for their good behavior. The reward may be extra recess or a special treat, but this will help students work harder if they know they will be rewarded for it. A teacher may also find it helpful if they stress good manners and respect at the beginning of school. If students are continually reminded of the teacher’s expectations for how to treat other students, hopefully students will catch on without having to be reminded. This may eliminate problem behavior throughout the rest of the year. A teacher must be sure he or she has an organized classroom set-up and daily schedule. If the teacher is prepared, this will help students stay on-task and fall into a routine where they know the schedule. When a classroom of students move around simultaneously, it can be quite hectic; therefore, a teacher could come up with clever ways to line students up or dismiss them to another location. This will help prevent misbehavior during this time. Also, a teacher may come up with a saying, song, or chant that can be used while the students are lining up. This would serve as an extra reminder to remain quiet while walking from the classroom to other locations in the school. When students are talkative and fidgety, the teacher may allow them to get out of their seats to stretch or do some kind of quick physical activity. This may allow them to re-focus their attention on their work. Managing a classroom is no easy task. A teacher must be creative and clever in coming up with specific techniques that do not allow for students to get out of hand (Brand, 2009). As long as he or she is prepared and consistent, students will become accustomed to the expectations and consequences of the classroom if they are established and emphasized immediately.

There are many techniques to help to maintain discipline within the high school classroom. High school teachers should build good relationships with their students. They should discover the different interests of each student. Teachers who seem interested in their students’ lives outside of the classroom will have a better relationship with the students within the classroom. It is important for teachers to set classroom rules and ensure that they are followed. Rules should be established on the first day of class and should be enforced throughout the year. Also, teachers should follow their own rules. A teacher cannot demand respect within the classroom if he or she is not modeling respect himself. This respect includes addressing problems in private. If a student is disruptive, the teacher should not embarrass the student by calling him out in front of his classmates. Teachers should place the weight of responsibility on their students’ shoulders. If a student is sent to the office, the teacher should convey the idea that the student is responsible for making the decision to be sent to the office rather than to sit in class and behave appropriately. This way the student cannot be mad at the teacher because it was the student’s decision to misbehave. Also, teachers should always be fully aware of the school’s policies. These policies should also be in effect within the classroom. Motivation is another good disciplinary tool, even for teens and young adults. Positive feedback should be given to students on a daily basis. When students know that they are doing something correctly, they will have motivation to keep up the good work. Teachers must keep in mind that some high school students may not want to be acknowledged in front of their peers. These students may feel awkward for being praised, so positive feedback in a private setting may serve as a better motivator (Gaut, 2002). High school classrooms should be designed to be exciting, positive, and safe places to learn. Implementing the correct management strategies will help to reduce, or even eliminate, discipline problems.

The climate and setting of a classroom is an overlooked piece that helps create an enjoyable experience for both the students and the teacher. The climate should be one where ideas and experiences can bounce off each other. The students should feel safe in letting their feelings and opinions known. There should be no shouting out or rudeness in the classroom. If this happens, the students should be given a verbal warning and more if the problem persists. Students need to know that they will not be laughed at or ridiculed for their thoughts and beliefs. In pertaining to physical education, the students need to treat others with respect and show good sportsmanlike conduct. They need to understand that learning new skills is more important than winning or losing. When there is a positive climate to the classroom, the students will enjoy the material more and be more excited about class. The setting of the class also plays an important role. In normal classrooms the setting should be educational and interesting. Posters can maintain student interest and help them learn. The class should also be organized with all of the teacher’s things being orderly and the desks being in an arrangement that makes sense, whether it is rows or tables. All of these things will help make classroom management easier for the teacher. With these ideas in place, the students will be more excited and involved with class.

Classroom management plays an essential role in the determination of whether a teacher is successful or whether the teacher needs to make modifications and adjustments to his or her teaching style. Managing the classroom is extremely important for a teacher to maintain control over his or her students; however, this section will focus centrally on managing the Physical Education classroom and the significance of ensuring proper structure in the gymnasium. It is important to minimize transition periods and down time in physical education because students use equipment in P.E. class that can lead to dangerous situations if the equipment is improperly used. Therefore, P.E. teachers must discover effective methods for managing the classroom in order to practice safe habits in the gymnasium. One way a P.E. teacher can effectively structure the classroom is to organize students into groups at the beginning of the year. For instance, the teacher could divide the students into five groups of approximately five students in each group (Burke, 2002). Then the teacher could assign a color to each group so that whenever the teacher needed to place the students into groups for activities, all the teacher would have to do is say the signal word (groups) and the students would know that they need to get in their groups. Another classroom management idea would be to use incentives for good behavior in the gymnasium. For example, one idea a teacher discovered was to place a poster of a baseball field on the gymnasium wall. Then each time the students dressed appropriately for class and followed the rules of the gymnasium, the students would score a run on the poster of the baseball field. For every five runs that are scored during the P.E. class, an award will be given. The awards could be the students having the opportunity to choose the class activity, choosing an award from a prize box, or the students could have an extra P.E. class the following week (Wright, 2002). This could be an effective way to encourage students to dress appropriately and be on their best behavior.

The role of the teacher, student, and classroom are all important in creating an effective classroom management style. Every student is different; one behavior management technique will not work for every child. It is important to treat each child with respect and dignity. The classroom itself should be a place of welcome and interest. The attitude of the teacher greatly impacts the behavior and feel of a class. By maintaining a positive and safe learning environment, students and teachers will have a more successful school year.

Article Written By:
John Hopkins, Amanda Carpenter, Lindsey Keyton, Josh Wilson, Emily Sisler

Article Edited By:
Amanda Rocus, Chrissy Records, Darbi Rosdail, Jamie Grove, and Rob Kesler

References:


Brand, C.D. (n.d). Classroom management tips and beginning of the year ideas. Retrieved from
http://www.fvsd.ab.ca/stm/classroom_management_tips_and _be.htm.


Burke, Dawn. (2002). All star award. Retrieved from
http://www.pecentral.org/lessonideas/viewlesson.asp?ID=3679.

Churchward, B. (2009). Strategies for discipline. Retrieved from
http://www.theteachersguide.com/ClassManagement.htm#Internet%20Resources.

Gaut, M. (2002). Discipline for the high school classroom. Retrieved from
http://www.essortment.com/family/disciplinehigh_snvz.htm

Wright, S. (2002). Team colors. Retrieved from
http://www.pecentral.org/lessonideas/viewlesson.asp?ID=3603